What Black Women Want for Our Children

Black women are always thinking about children – our own, other peoples’, and youngsters, whom we think of as our children in some way. We talked to a few Black women (including each other!) about our desires for the little and big people in our lives – the precious beings we are raising and helping to become adults in a crazy world.

What do you want for your/our children?  Please share in the comments.

Joanne:
One of my biggest challenges as a Mom to two black girls has been countering the constant messaging from current events and pop culture that tells them they are “less than” – less smart, less pretty, less valued. As my girls become women, what I want most for them is that they know in their souls.  In the deepest parts of their being, I want them to know that they are capable and they are worthy. That conviction will help gird them for life’s challenges. And it will also afford them this wonderful self-perpetuating gift of fully owning and not discounting, all of their successes that lie ahead.

Alicia:
I want my children to live balanced lives, to pursue careers that matter to them, and to achieve even greater happiness and financial success than I have.  I know people who have done very well financially, who don’t seem to have balanced lives.  They don’t seem happy.  A balanced life is full; it means that you have loving relationships, a satisfying career and interests that are meaningful to you.

Angela:
I want the children in my life to know how special they are, and to always believe in themselves regardless of the messages that the world might send them. I want them to understand that it is possible for them to achieve a lot in this world if they set their minds to it, and are relentless in their pursuit. I hope they will embrace life’s sweet daily joys and be happy, good people.

Pamela:
I want my children to fearlessly pursue their passions, armed with the wisdom to understand that the limitations others inevitably will place upon them are not “truth” but merely obstacles that they have been oh-so-well prepared to overcome.

Lamora:
I want my kids to do better than they see the next person doing. I want them to love and respect themselves, and to show the world that through their actions. I advise them to be leaders, not followers, and I am raising some leaders! Finally, whatever they are trying to achieve, I want them to pursue it now, not later.  Don’t let fear or procrastination slow you down.

Jocelyn:
I want my daughter and all young people in our world to “self-actualize.”  To me, this means having access to abundant opportunities so that they can figure out who they are as humans and how they want to be in our world.  So much potential is lost when society limits what we can become.  And no child’s destiny should be determined by something as random as their zip code.  I want all children to have the resources they need to fulfill their own dreams.

As a Black woman, what do you want for your and our children?  Please share in the comments.